Exciting innovations in pediatric neuroscience

New programs, research, stories, and continued efforts to provide the best neurosciences care to patients.

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Don’t miss your 2019 Epilepsy Awareness Month T-Shirt

Place your order before Oct. 16 for delivery in time for November.

Kid sizes and various styles available.

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Forging the way as leaders.

The Arcuate, from the Jane and John Justin Neurosciences Center, provides information on new programs, innovations and our continued efforts to bring the best neurosciences care to the patients of Cook Children’s, the state of Texas, and beyond.

Latin for “curved bundle,” the arcuate fasciculus is essential to communication, as it connects Wernicke’s area (receptive speech) to Broca’s area (expressive speech) in the brain. Without it, we could never effectively convey our ideas, accomplishments and plans for the future.

The Arcuate Newsletter keeps you on the edge of research news.

Sign up to receive relevant updates on research, programs and our continued efforts in pediatric neuroscience.

Subscribe to Arcuate

View sample newsletter

Order a shirt

Don’t miss your 2019 Epilepsy Awareness Month T-Shirt

Place your order before Oct. 16 for delivery in time for November.

Kid sizes and various styles available.

Order online

You will be redirected to CustomInk.com, a trusted partner, to place your order.

Forging the way as leaders.

The Arcuate, from the Jane and John Justin Neurosciences Center, provides information on new programs, innovations and our continued efforts to bring the best neurosciences care to the patients of Cook Children’s, the state of Texas, and beyond.

Latin for “curved bundle,” the arcuate fasciculus is essential to communication, as it connects Wernicke’s area (receptive speech) to Broca’s area (expressive speech) in the brain. Without it, we could never effectively convey our ideas, accomplishments and plans for the future.

The Arcuate Newsletter keeps you on the edge of research news.

Sign up to receive relevant updates on research, programs and our continued efforts in pediatric neuroscience.

Subscribe to Arcuate

View sample newsletter

Recent Arcuate Articles

Patient at table writing Testing for Success – Primary Steps for Primary Care (2/26/2019) - Hearing the word “neuropsychological” can make any child feel confused and scared. The idea of testing may also bring up unpleasant associations with school tests or painful shots. At Cook Children’s, our program is developed with kids in mind. Tests are introduced as “games,” and most children find them fun and entertaining. Pediatric neuropsychologists are trained to communicate with young patients and use prizes … Continue reading Testing for Success – Primary Steps for Primary Care
girl with headache Complementary and Alternative Therapies for Migraine Treatment (10/3/2019) - Migraine is a common reason for referral to pediatric neurology. Very often, lifestyle modifications such as improved sleep, regular exercise, adequate hydration and avoidance of migraine triggers can reduce the frequency of migraines. For some, despite these measures, migraines continue to occur many times per month and require further treatment. One approach to treatment includes daily medications used to prevent migraines from occurring. Reasonably, … Continue reading Complementary and Alternative Therapies for Migraine Treatment
Leading Edge: Christos Papadelis, M.D. Joins Cook Children’s Neurosciences as New Director of Research Center (10/3/2019) - The Cook Children’s Dodson Neuroscience Research Endowment was founded in 2018 to support research aimed at improving the diagnosis and treatment of epilepsy, along with other common neurological conditions. The Endowment funds a team of dedicated research staff to work closely with neuroscience faculty on study design, data analysis and publication of results. This team will produce research which serves as the foundation of … Continue reading Leading Edge: Christos Papadelis, M.D. Joins Cook Children’s Neurosciences as New Director of Research Center
Little girl in emergency room New-Onset Seizure Clinic Seeks to Decrease Wait Time for Initial Evaluation (7/11/2019) - A child’s first unprovoked seizure is one of the most common problems referred to pediatric neurologists. This affects up to 40,000 children each year. While most of these patients will never have a second seizure, it is a frightening time for the family as they await diagnostic workup and neurology consultation. To help expedite care, Cook Children’s Neurosciences has opened a New-Onset Seizure Clinic … Continue reading New-Onset Seizure Clinic Seeks to Decrease Wait Time for Initial Evaluation
Child learning to take steps Physiatry Addition to Cook Children’s Comprehensive Neurorehabilitation Program (6/18/2019) - Cook Children’s Neurosciences Center has long provided comprehensive rehabilitation services to children through our state-of-the-art Neurorehabilitation Unit, Motion Lab, and multispecialty clinics for cerebral palsy, spasticity, movement disorders, stroke, and neuromuscular disease. Starting August 2019, Cook Children’s Jane and John Justin Neurosciences Center will expand our neurorehabilitation services with the addition of Pediatric Physiatrist Kristen Taylor , D.O., Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (PM&R), further bolstering … Continue reading Physiatry Addition to Cook Children’s Comprehensive Neurorehabilitation Program
Baby being monitored for seizures Defining Impact of Early Life Epilepsy on Patient Outcomes (6/18/2019) -  It is well known that early-life epilepsies (ELEs) are associated with poor outcomes including intractable or drug-resistant seizures, developmental and cognitive disabilities, poor regulation of other functions controlled by the nervous system, as well as increased risk for mortality. Early-life epilepsies are defined by a diagnosis of epilepsy greater than 28 days of life and less than 3 years of age and are often … Continue reading Defining Impact of Early Life Epilepsy on Patient Outcomes
Diagnosis Craniosynostosis A Tandem Approach to Treating Craniosynostosis (6/18/2019) - At Cook Children’s, we feel the best way to correct a birth defect called craniosynostosis is with a little teamwork. The sutures on an infant’s skull are active areas of skull growth designed to accommodate the rapid growth of the neonate brain. In the first six months the head will grow about ½ to 1 inch per month and then from six to 12 … Continue reading A Tandem Approach to Treating Craniosynostosis

Close
Order a shirt

Don’t miss your 2019 Epilepsy Awareness Month T-Shirt

Place your order before Oct. 16 for delivery in time for November.

Kid sizes and various styles available.

Order online

You will be redirected to CustomInk.com, a trusted partner, to place your order.

Forging the way as leaders.

The Arcuate, from the Jane and John Justin Neurosciences Center, provides information on new programs, innovations and our continued efforts to bring the best neurosciences care to the patients of Cook Children’s, the state of Texas, and beyond.

Latin for “curved bundle,” the arcuate fasciculus is essential to communication, as it connects Wernicke’s area (receptive speech) to Broca’s area (expressive speech) in the brain. Without it, we could never effectively convey our ideas, accomplishments and plans for the future.

The Arcuate Newsletter keeps you on the edge of research news.

Sign up to receive relevant updates on research, programs and our continued efforts in pediatric neuroscience.

Subscribe to Arcuate

View sample newsletter